Study finds 2 primary factors contribute to pedestrian accidents

An accident involving a pedestrian and a motor vehicle can result in serious, potentially fatal injuries for the pedestrian. Unfortunately, these accidents are not uncommon. A publication in the United States National Library of Medicine's National Institutes of Health (NIH) notes that "traffic-related pedestrian injuries are a growing public health threat."

These types of accidents are of particular concern for residents of California. A piece in the Los Angeles Times reports that the state leads the nation in pedestrian accident fatalities.

What can be done to reduce the risk of these accidents? Knowledge is power. One step to help reduce the risk of becoming a victim involves knowing the factors that contribute to these accidents. The publication by NIH reports that two primary factors contribute to these accidents:

  • When. There are certain times of day that these accidents are more likely to occur. The time period between 6 in the evening and midnight is the most dangerous likely due to reduced visibility and alcohol consumption.
  • Where. The majority of accidents occur in non-intersections. As a result, pedestrians can take a proactive step to reduce their risk by crossing the street at designated intersections.

The report by NIH also states that children and the elderly are at particular risk for these types of accidents. One of these accidents occurs every eight minutes. If you or a loved one is in such a crash, you are not alone. Legal remedies are available that can help the injured cover medical costs, rehabilitation and other expenses that result from the accident. Contact an attorney experienced in pedestrian accident cases to discuss your options.

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